Birds

Common Eider male with satellite transmitter. The transmitter is placed niside the body cavity. Only the antenna is visible.
Common Eider male with satellite transmitter. The transmitter is placed niside the body cavity. Only the antenna is visible. Photo: Anders Mosbech.

Why ring Birds?

Help science by returning information of rings to Greenland Institute of Natural Resources!
See here what you can do if you read or find a bird with rings, tags or a satellite transmitter

Ringing, banding or tagging birds is a scientific way to study migration of birds. Other data on survival, cause of death, age composition etc. can be extracted from ringing. Many birds in Greenland are ringed abroad. It is only possible to receive these data, with the active support from the public.

In Greenland more than 280,000 birds have been ringed with metal rings from Zoological Museum, Copenhagen. Ringing started in 1926 and more than 300 ringers have contributed from all over Greenland.

The effort has revealed more than 15,500 recoveries form more than 40 species of birds. Another 2000 birds ringed abroad have been recovered in Greenland. Foreign ringing has added at least 14 species more to the list.

The ringing activity in Greenland has decreased since the 1980s, but annually between 50 and 100 ringed birds of foreign origin is recovered in Greenland.

Within the last 20 years new methods like colour rings, geo loggers and satellite transmitters has been developed. These methods are often much more expensive, but are able to give much more detailed information in a short time. Information that is often not possible to get from metal rings.

Updated 06.08.2011